Game Change

Raising the Bar from

Intervention

to

Prevention

Asking artists and athletes - heroes to so many - to get the ball rolling and break the cycle of violence before it affects the next generation

National Statistics

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In a single year, nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner.

Nearly 70% of women and 54% of men who have been physically or sexually abused, or stalked by a dating partner, first experience abuse between the ages of 11-24.

1 in 15 Children

1 in 15 children are exposed to intimate partner violence each year, and 90% of these children are eyewitnesses to this violence.

94% of Female Victims

Among female victims of intimate partner violence, 94% of those were ages 16-19 years old.

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Suicide Ideation Over 10% More Common in Girls

18.8% of students nationwide reported seriously considering attempting suicide (prevalence significantly higher among female [24.1%] than male [13.3%] students).

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of Students

In 2017, 16 percent of students in grades 9‑12 reported that they had carried a weapon. Four percent reported carrying a weapon on school property at least one day during the previous 30 days.

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of Students Bullied

About 20% of students ages 12-18 experienced bullying nationwide, 15% were bullied online or by text.

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Boys 10x More Likely
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Girls 6x More Likely

A boy who sees his mother being abused is ten times more likely to abuse his female partner as an adult. A girl who grows up in a home where her father abuses her mother is more than six times as likely to be sexually abused as a girl who grows up in a non-abusive home.

No Intervention

6x

more likely to commit suicide

50%

more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol

74%

more likely to commit a violent crime

Violence Interrupted

By providing:

  • Gender-based Violence Prevention
  • Healthy Masculinity
  • Bystander Education
  • Girls Inc. of the Seacoast Area
  • Intervention Services

Change the Game

Have a Positive Impact

Funding the $1 Million Goal

Funding Levels

Top the Charts
$50,000

Funds and trains a new facilitator to continue to grow and deliver the prevention programs.

Raise the Bar
$40,000

Provides one year of healthy relationship education to 8 schools.

Change the Tempo
$30,000

Funds an all-male healthy masculinity program called “The Mask You Live in” for 15 schools.

Making Champions
$20,000

Enrolls 20 children who have witnessed violence in a week-long session to our Harry Potter child therapy program.

Break the Cycle
$10,000

Funds bystander education for one high school.

Intervention

Caped participants waving wands during the Center’s Harry Potter’s Real Magic group, a trauma focused therapeutic group that helps children heal after domestic abuse.

Across the United States, more than 15 million children in the United States live in homes where domestic violence has happened at least once. 90% of these children witness the violence. Studies consistently reveal that children who are exposed to domestic violence have more social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive and general health problems than children from families free of intimate partner violence.

Research shows that experiencing violence in childhood impacts lifelong health and well-being. These children are at greater risk for repeating the cycle as adults by entering into abusive relationships or becoming abusers themselves. For example, a boy who sees his mother being abused is 10 times more likely to abuse his female partner as an adult. A girl who grows up in a home where her father abuses her mother is more than six times as likely to be sexually abused as a girl who grows up in a non-abusive home.

Since 1998, the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center children’s trauma program has created safe and supportive interventions for children who have either witnessed domestic violence or been physically abused themselves.

Prevention

Girls Inc. of the Seacoast Area students attending our annual White Ribbon Breakfast in support of our prevention programs.

We know that patterns of abuse start early; we also know that early intervention and prevention can change the culture of violence. Our Youth Empowerment Services (YES) use research-based and nationally recognized approaches to educate both girls, boys and students who are gender non-conforming. YES prevention programs teach elementary, middle and high school students how to lead conversations about healthy relationships, recognize signs of an abusive relationship, and become empowered to make positive and healthy decisions.

The Game Change Campaign for Growth will enable us to provide students with deeper and more transformative educational programs to help break the cycle of violence before it affects the next generation. Our $1 million goal will allow us to incorporate more programs and serve more youth, targeting those young people most at-risk for abuse.

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Local Area Youth

During the past three years the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center provided intervention and prevention services to 3,697 local area youth. Our goal is to do more! We want to double our impact within the next three years.

Communities We Serve

Communities We Serve

Communities Key: StarOffice Locations

  • Newburyport: Administrative Office
  • Amesbury: Survivor Survices, Youth Empowerment Services
  • Lawrence: Children’s Trauma Program
  • Lawrence: Abuse Education

Communities Key: CircleSurvivor Services, Children’s Trauma Program

Communities Key: TriangleYouth Empowerment Services

Primary Courts Served by Abuser Intervention:

  • Haverhill District Court
  • Lawrence District Court
  • Lawrence Superior Court
  • Lowell District Court
  • Middlesex Superior Court
  • Newburyport District Court
DVHRT States

In addition to serving 16 communities in Massachusetts the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center has a National reach – 21 states have implemented the Domestic Violence High Risk Team (DVHRT) Model, including 26 teams spanning several counties throughout Massachusetts.

Why Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center?

The Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center is a non-profit social justice organization that works with survivors and their families to provide free and confidential support. We work to identify unhealthy relationships and respond to the needs of survivors and their families in crisis due to domestic violence. Our mission is to empower individuals and engage communities to end domestic violence.

Since 1982, we have been using research-based practices and innovative approaches to provide comprehensive services to survivors of domestic violence. Our track record of success has taught us important lessons about the direction of our work. We know that patterns of abuse start early; we also know that early intervention can prevent future violence.

Youth Empowerment Services (YES)

In order to break the cycle of violence before it affects the next generation, the Center offers our innovative Youth Empowerment Services (YES) through these four programs:

  • Gender-based Violence Prevention
  • Healthy Masculinity
  • Bystander Education
  • Girls Inc. of the Seacoast Area

Through these programs, we empower girls, foster healthy dating relationships, and engage boys, girls and students who are gender non-conforming in violence prevention. We are currently reaching students in upper elementary school through high school.

During the past three years, YES programming was provided to over 3,697 students and faculty in schools across Essex County with a goal of doubling those numbers over the next three years.

Now that I am in High School and participating in bystander education, I am using this as my chance to give back to everyone who has helped me. I am hopeful that with bystander education and the efforts of the Crisis Center we can change this cycle of violence so other kids do not have to go through what I went through.

A client of the Center and high school participant in Bystander Education

Contact Us

To learn more about our Game Change Campaign or to donate, please contact:

Suzanne Dubus
Chief Executive Officer
Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center
978-255-9161
scdubus@jeannegeiger.org

Kelly Majewski
Director of Advancement
978-255-9165
kmajewski@jeannegeiger.org